PM should reflect as to who uses harsh, provocative language: Congress

PM should reflect as to who uses harsh, provocative language: Congress


National | Written by : IANS| Updated:

 

PM should reflect as to who uses harsh, provocative language: Congress

New Delhi, Sep 25 : Hitting out at Prime Minister Narendra Modi, Congress on Monday said that his rhetoric was not matched by the "reality on the ground" and his government has proven to be an "utter failure".

Reacting to Modi's remarks in his speech at BJP's national executive that the opposition was using harsh language against the government, it said he should reflect as to who uses such "harsh and provocative" words. It also said that his regime doesn't know how to govern, and delivering speeches is its only style.

"There is a gap between PM's rhetoric and reality on the ground," said Congress spokesperson Manish Tewari. 

"The fact is that the BJP is only an instrument of electoral math and those electoral dividends are reaped by polarising the society. While the PM is entitled to make sanctimonious and preachy statements about the BJP being an instrument of mass welfare, the fact is BJP is nothing more than an electoral instrument predicated on polarising and dividing society for electoral gain." 

Reminding Modi of the remarks he made against the opposition leaders, Tewari said: "This is very unfortunate. PM Modi is known for his harsh words. 

"50 crore ki girlfriend, samshan aur kabristan, James Michael Lyngdoh, to use the word puppy for a particular community, these are not our words. These are Modi's words. As far as using harsh and provocative language is concerned, Modi should reflect and introspect as to whose words these were." 

On the completion of BJP's 40 months in office on Tuesday, Tewari said the essence of this period can be "summed up in one sentence: that the NDA-BJP government under PM Narendra Modi does not know how to govern this country".

Noting every government can be benchmarked on five standards - social cohesion, political stability, internal security, economic development, and international relations, he said that in all of this, it has "proven to be an utter failure" and could not offer anything beyond rhetoric.